As a moderator on TO,

I spend a lot of time reading reviews from our awesome community. This week, while leaving a review of my own, I started thinking about how I’ve fallen short as a reviewer myself. I am much quicker to leave a negative review for a requester than a positive one. Many of us on TO are this way. I’m speaking to myself more than anyone when I say this. Shouldn’t we want the good requesters to get the recognition they deserve? We want them to find Amazon Mechanical Turk to be the platform they need to get their hits done. We want them to stick around, do more studies and tell their colleagues about it. As a worker I also want to see the good. I want to know about the hits I should be doing, not just the ones to stay away from. So many requesters are falling through the cracks, especially the newer ones that are not being reviewed at all on TO. If you’re like me, you may even try to stay away from the unreviewed requesters. Thinking about my experience though, if I have had trouble with a hit from a new requester, the majority of the time it gets resolved with an email. They have to start somewhere, and as someone who helps represent TO, I should be willing to give them a chance. So this week I’m making a real effort to leave reviews for all levels of requesters, and especially the new ones. Even if it’s just one a week, I encourage you to do the same.

Newsletter 5

Welcome to our 5th Newsletter 

Our  August 2020 newsletter. We will be sending a newsletter out once a month to keep you up to date with what is going on at Turkopticon. You can see our previous newsletters on our blog here

We are also now taking on helping suspended accounts be reinstated if they were suspended in error, talking with requesters to improve conditions, and passing all the suggestions from Turkers and requesters on to Amazon to actually make our Turk work better. During this transition we have added a donate page to our website, blog and newsletter. We are in no way saying you have to donate but we are asking that if you want the service remain free and you are able: please donate. We also plan to look for and locate other funding but your donations will be important too!  Please help us remain free so we can work to make Turk better for all of us!

See the bottom of the newsletter for how you can submit short articles.

New Pay buckets for Reviews Update

We have been trying the new pay buckets for nearly a month now and it seems that most of you seem to like the new system. We did have a few issues with other scripts that use our data in the 1st 24hrs which we managed to sort out. We really apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused you. We hope you think it was worth while

The new pay buckets will replace the old generosity rating when the new reviews start to come through for a requester. 

The new script is available if you have not already updated script available to display the new feature. 

We are still looking for your feedback as to what you think of it and look forward to your comments. We would love to hear feedback via either on our Facebook page, Twitter or by email.

Turkopticon is looking for suggestions!

Do you have suggestions for how to make Turkopticon better and want to share them, please email volunteercoms@turkopticon.net and someone will be in contact to further hear about your suggestions and see how we all can work together to make Turk better for all of us.

Even if you think your  ideas are ones we should know please don’t be afraid to send them our way because we listen to all suggestions and want everyone to be heard!

As a moderator on TO,

I spend a lot of time reading reviews from our awesome community. This week, while leaving a review of my own, I started thinking about how I’ve fallen short as a reviewer myself. I am much quicker to leave a negative review for a requester than a positive one. Many of us on TO are this way. I’m speaking to myself more than anyone when I say this. Shouldn’t we want the good requesters to get the recognition they deserve? We want them to find Amazon Mechanical Turk to be the platform they need to get their hits done. We want them to stick around, do more studies and tell their colleagues about it. As a worker I also want to see the good. I want to know about the hits I should be doing, not just the ones to stay away from. So many requesters are falling through the cracks, especially the newer ones that are not being reviewed at all on TO. If you’re like me, you may even try to stay away from the unreviewed requesters. Thinking about my experience though, if I have had trouble with a hit from a new requester, the majority of the time it gets resolved with an email. They have to start somewhere, and as someone who helps represent TO, I should be willing to give them a chance. So this week I’m making a real effort to leave reviews for all levels of requesters, and especially the new ones. Even if it’s just one a week, I encourage you to do the same.

Join Us on Facebook! 

The Turkopticon community is growing!  Our Facebook page went live on Thursday, June 4th and we would love for you to join us. Participate in the conversations, learn about upcoming projects, and stay up to date on the latest news by giving us a “like.” You can find the page by searching for Turkopticon or visiting https://www.facebook.com/Turkopticon/.

Participation in an Art Film

Hello, I am a visual artist that makes short films.

I am looking for Mturk worker participants for a short art film about the labor conditions of online work. Participants will re-perform moments from a failed utopian labor camp set up by Henry Ford in the 1920s in the Brazilian Amazon. We will re-perform scenes from this real history as if it was happening now. Participants will need to have the ability to shoot footage at their location on their own devices. At a later date, participants will be paid to travel to a specific location for a studio shoot with me and a professional film crew.

This position will be paid, and participants will need to agree to an ongoing involvement in the project from now until the end of the year.

During the Coronovirus pandemic, all work will happen online.

We will meet and shoot in person only when it is entirely safe to do so.

Please contact me if you are interested in participating:

danielledeanstudio@gmail.com

Article submitted

Submitting articles to the Turkopticon newsletter

This newsletter is a space for us at the Turkopticon community to hear from each other. Submit short pieces up to 250 words to newsletter@turkopticon.net with Newsletter submission in the subject line.

Submissions should follow the civility guidelines. Want more than 250 words? 

Get in touch and let us know your article idea.

New Pay buckets for Reviews

After careful consideration we’ve decided to temporarily implement pay brackets in place of the current 1-5 scale rating for pay. The current rating system doesn’t take into account workers being spread across the globe and other various influences that affect judgement of pay. We hope this will help workers better determine hits they want to do, and remove the frustration some workers were experiencing with the pay ratings in the past. We’ll plan to test this new system out for the month, and depending on how our community feels decide if it will be a permanent feature. There is also an updated script available to display the new feature. We would love to hear feedback via either on our Facebook page or by email.

You Cannot Have a Community Without Communication

I realize that the title of this article may sound a bit corny to some but I have been thinking about this a lot lately. In my opinion, it rings very true!

When AMT was launched in 2005, even though there were thousands (possibly more) who began working on the platform, workers did not have contact with each other. There were no training modules, no way to communicate on the AMT platform, and people were left to figure it all out on their own.

It did not take long for individual workers to become a community, however. Workers began organizing on forums and social media. Groups were formed on Facebook and became a place workers could not only ask for help but they could “meet” each other as well. The various forums allowed for this as well. 

Over the years it has been us, the workers, who have organized, helped each other, and taught one another. Turkers have built a massive virtual infrastructure which has transformed turking into full and part-time jobs for so many. 

While we may be spread out across the world, one thing has allowed us to build this infrastructure: Communication.  Think about it for a moment. We have not worked together in person yet we have stronger tools at our disposal than many brick and mortar companies because we have communicated our needs to each other, built what we needed, and continued to improve upon it as we encounter changes with requesters and AMT in general as a community.

On a personal note, this community has led to some amazing friendships for me. We send care packages back and forth, chat often about life, and share photos of our families. These people know if I am having a bad day by how I communicate online. Likewise, I can tell when my friends are having rough days for the same reasons. 

I think it bears repeating that we cannot have a community without communication. Fellow turkers, I would say our communication skills are among the strongest I have seen during my twenty-five years in the workforce. I am thankful for the turker community and proud to be a member of it. I am excited to see where our collective skills lead us in the future as we continue to build a better AMT experience for all of us.

by Krystal Kauffman

Newsletter 4

Welcome to our 4th Newsletter 

Our  July 2020 newsletter. We will be sending a newsletter out once a month to keep you up to date with what is going on at Turkopticon. You can see our previous newsletters on our blog here

First, I want to thank Lilly Irani, Six Silberman and any past contributors for all their hard work and dedication to create Turkopticon and operate it for ten years for FREE! One thing we need to remember is that they always provided this service for free to help Turkers find the good work and what work to avoid. We are now transitioning to a completely Turker run, non-profit organization. This will ensure that we can continue to provide a worker run review site where we focus on the human part of reviews. We understand people make mistakes and errors and we now have mods that will reach out to help Turkers and requesters understand how to make things better. We are also now taking on helping suspended accounts be reinstated if they were suspended in error, talking with requesters to improve conditions, and passing all the suggestions from Turkers and requesters on to Amazon to actually make our Turk work better. During this transition we are adding a donate page to our website, blog and newsletter. We are in no way saying you have to donate but we are asking that if you want the service remain free and you are able: please donate. We also plan to look for and locate other funding but your donations will be important too!  Please help us remain free so we can work to make Turk better for all of us!

See the bottom of the newsletter for how you can submit short articles.

New Pay buckets for Reviews

After careful consideration we’ve decided to temporarily implement pay brackets in place of the current 1-5 scale rating for pay. The current rating system doesn’t take into account workers being spread across the globe and other various influences that affect judgement of pay. We hope this will help workers better determine hits they want to do, and remove the frustration some workers were experiencing with the pay ratings in the past. We’ll plan to test this new system out for the month, and depending on how our community feels decide if it will be a permanent feature. There is also an updated  script available to display the new feature. We would love to hear feedback via either on our Facebook page, Twitter or by email.

You Cannot Have a Community Without Communication

I realize that the title of this article may sound a bit corny to some but I have been thinking about this a lot lately. In my opinion, it rings very true!

When AMT was launched in 2005, even though there were thousands (possibly more) who began working on the platform, workers did not have contact with each other. There were no training modules, no way to communicate on the AMT platform, and people were left to figure it all out on their own.

It did not take long for individual workers to become a community, however. Workers began organizing on forums and social media. Groups were formed on Facebook and became a place workers could not only ask for help but they could “meet” each other as well. The various forums allowed for this as well. 

Over the years it has been us, the workers, who have organized, helped each other, and taught one another. Turkers have built a massive virtual infrastructure which has transformed turking into full and part-time jobs for so many. 

While we may be spread out across the world, one thing has allowed us to build this infrastructure: Communication.  Think about it for a moment. We have not worked together in person yet we have stronger tools at our disposal than many brick and mortar companies because we have communicated our needs to each other, built what we needed, and continued to improve upon it as we encounter changes with requesters and AMT in general as a community.

On a personal note, this community has led to some amazing friendships for me. We send care packages back and forth, chat often about life, and share photos of our families. These people know if I am having a bad day by how I communicate online. Likewise, I can tell when my friends are having rough days for the same reasons. 

I think it bears repeating that we cannot have a community without communication. Fellow turkers, I would say our communication skills are among the strongest I have seen during my twenty-five years in the workforce. I am thankful for the turker community and proud to be a member of it. I am excited to see where our collective skills lead us in the future as we continue to build a better AMT experience for all of us.

by Krystal Kauffman

Are you using an older browser to turk?

Due to upcoming changes in browser security, MTurk will no longer support Microsoft IExplorer 11 (+ older) & Edge Legacy browsers.

Workers attempting to reach worker.mturk.com using these browsers will encounter an error message.

Join Us on Facebook! 

The Turkopticon community is growing!  Our Facebook page went live on Thursday, June 4th and we would love for you to join us. Participate in the conversations, learn about upcoming projects, and stay up to date on the latest news by giving us a “like.” You can find the page by searching for Turkopticon or visiting 

https://www.facebook.com/Turkopticon/

.

Participation in an Art Film

Hello, I am a visual artist that makes short films.

I am looking for Mturk worker participants for a short art film about the labor conditions of online work. Participants will re-perform moments from a failed utopian labor camp set up by Henry Ford in the 1920s in the Brazilian Amazon. We will re-perform scenes from this real history as if it was happening now. Participants will need to have the ability to shoot footage at their location on their own devices. At a later date, participants will be paid to travel to a specific location for a studio shoot with me and a professional film crew.

This position will be paid, and participants will need to agree to an ongoing involvement in the project from now until the end of the year.

During the Coronovirus pandemic, all work will happen online.

We will meet and shoot in person only when it is entirely safe to do so.

Please contact me if you are interested in participating:

danielledeanstudio@gmail.com

Article submitted 

Newsletter 2

Welcome to our 2nd Newsletter

We had a few problems sending the 1st newsletter out, we know quite a few of you did not receive it but from now on this problem should not be a problem. Please add us to your contacts so you don’t miss our next newsletter. We will be sending a newsletter out once a month to keep you up to date with what is going on at Turkopticon. See the bottom of the newsletter for how you can submit short articles.

We have had some great success since the last newsletter with Amazon over the past few weeks, Turkopticon was able to help a few workers get their accounts reinstated that had been suspended by error. If you feel your account has been suspended in error please contact us worker.liaison@turkopticon.info and we will try and help you get your account reinstated.

Table of contents:

  • Workshop Invitation: How can work be made better during and after COVID-19?

  • Turking during COVID-19 Survey results

  • International payments to a US Bank Account

  • Participation in an Art Film

  • Amazon workers in New York, Chicago, and Detroit have walked out.

How can work be made better during and after COVID-19?

Share how work and livelihood has changed for you with COVID-19 and let’s decide together what we want to do about it. Come to a meeting for workers to share your thoughts and experiences with COVID-19 and the resources available to you. Let’s discuss how we can ride out this crisis with help from the government, Amazon, and one another. We will have facilitated small group discussions and end by setting priorities for how we as the Turkopticon community should advocate for our needs moving forward. Please RSVP here: Eventbrite. You can direct comments, questions, concerns, or accessibility needs to info@turkopticon.info.

Survey results

Turkopticon ran a survey two weeks ago to see how COVID-19 was affecting our worker community. Thank you to the almost 200 people who responded and helped us better understand the community’s needs. The survey asked how COVID affected Turkers’ income, family responsibilities, and needs for assistance.

Some highlights from the survey (View anonymized results here):

  • 70% of Turkers report that their Turking time has stayed stable, but more than half report their family responsibilities have increased due to COVID-19 — elder care, homeschooling, more cooking, and entertaining family at home are all taking more time.

  • 76% said they would welcome help from Amazon during this worldwide emergency, compared to 53% who said they would welcome charity and 91% said they would welcome support from the government.

  • 55% said they could use financial assistance and 22% could use mental and physical health care. Some also asked for and are giving prayer.

With the passage of the Congress’ Covid-19 package, gig workers and freelancers now qualify for unemployment insurance in many circumstances. This is in addition to the $1200 of direct payment to most Americans. CNBC News reports delays for some as some government offices adjust to gig workers’ new eligibility. To help you navigate this, Team Turkopticon has built a spreadsheet of non-profit legal aid offices across 50 states that can help you understand what you qualify for, assist you in filling out forms, and lead you to the right places to get any help you may need.

Legal aid across 50 states: https://tinyurl.com/legalaid-50states

Also, we are here to help you any way we possibly can, contact Turkopticon with any questions at info@turkoption.info.

Or come to the forum turkopticon-discuss to share needs and ideas for improving our working conditions and lives. We are all in this together!

International payments to a US Bank Account

Are you having trouble withdrawing your balance from your Mturk account. If you live in the following countries Australia, Austria, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Malta, Poland, Netherlands, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom your best solution is opening a Transferwise Borderless Account and you can setup a US Bank account and get paid from Amazon directly into there.

It’s free to set up your TransferWise account.

It’s free to get your international bank details and free to receive money using those bank details. There’s a cheap, transparent fee to convert between currencies – either in your account or if you spend on your TransferWise debit Mastercard® in a currency you don’t have in your account.

When you convert money in your account it’s always with the real exchange rate, and you always see our low, transparent fee up front so there’s never any surprises. And if you spend on your debit Mastercard in a currency you don’t have, it autoconverts the balance with the lowest fee, so you never have to worry.

Participation in an Art Film

Hello, I am a visual artist that makes short films.

I am looking for Mturk worker participants for a short art film about the labor conditions of online work. Participants will re-perform moments from a failed utopian labor camp set up by Henry Ford in the 1920s in the Brazilian Amazon. We will re-perform scenes from this real history as if it was happening now. Participants will need to have the ability to shoot footage at their location on their own devices. At a later date, participants will be paid to travel to a specific location for a studio shoot with me and a professional film crew.

This position will be paid, and participants will need to agree to an ongoing involvement in the project from now until the end of the year.

During the Coronovirus pandemic, all work will happen online.

We will meet and shoot in person only when it is entirely safe to do so.

Please contact me if you are interested in participating:

danielledeanstudio@gmail.com

Article submitted

Submitting articles to the Turkopticon newsletter

This newsletter is a space for us at the Turkopticon community to hear from each other. Submit short pieces up to 250 words to newsletter@turkopticon.net with Newsletter submission in the subject line.

Submissions should follow the civility guidelines. Want more than 250 words?

Get in touch and let us know your article idea.

International payments to a US Bank Account

Are you having trouble withdrawing your balance from your Mturk account. If you live in the following countries Australia, Austria, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Malta, Poland, Netherlands, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom your best solution is opening a Transferwise Borderless Account and you can setup a US Bank account and get paid from Amazon directly into there.

It’s free to set up your TransferWise account.

It’s free to get your international bank details and free to receive money using those bank details. There’s a cheap, transparent fee to convert between currencies – either in your account or if you spend on your TransferWise debit Mastercard® in a currency you don’t have in your account.

When you convert money in your account it’s always with the real exchange rate, and you always see our low, transparent fee up front so there’s never any surprises. And if you spend on your debit Mastercard in a currency you don’t have, it autoconverts the balance with the lowest fee, so you never have to worry.

Newsletter 3

Welcome to our 3rd Newsletter

Our June 2020 newsletter. Please update your profile to continue receiving our newsletters. Let us know if you would like to keep getting the newsletter by updating your “newsletter opt-in”at https://turkopticon.ucsd.edu/settings
We will be sending a newsletter out once a month to keep you up to date with what is going on at Turkopticon. See the bottom of the newsletter for how you can submit short articles.

“Turking IS a job. I am asking you to own it with me. I am asking you to stand up with me for proper treatment. I am asking you to be proud of the work you do and I am asking you to help change the narrative.” Read on below for Turkopticon committee member “Krystal Kauffman” on “Turking is a Job.”

Calling All Requesters!

Turkopticon is hosting a Requester Communication Workshop for requesters on Wednesday, June 24 at 2:00pm EST. Join the Turkopticon organizing committee to talk about a variety of topics. Please join us! We will be talking about a variety of topics and would love for you to join us! If you are interested please contact us at Requestercom@turkopticon.net


Join Us on Facebook!

The Turkopticon community is growing!  Our Facebook page went live on Thursday, June 4th and we would love for you to join us. Participate in the conversations, learn about upcoming projects, and stay up to date on the latest news by giving us a “like.” You can find the page by searching for Turkopticon or visiting https://www.facebook.com/Turkopticon/.

I recently spoke with a friend I had not talked to for several months. As with most “catch-up” conversations, the topic of jobs came up quickly. She asked me how things were going for me with work. I told her that since the height of COVID-19 in the United States some of the work had dwindled as companies and universities were shutting down. I explained how frustrating it was. I told her how I was taking whatever work I could, even if the pay was low. She meant well but she said the thing that I cannot stand hearing:“It is too bad that you can’t work a real job.”


I know I am not the only turker who has heard this or something similar. Of course I wanted to say so many different things in response but I didn’t. This did make me think long and hard about how I feel about what I do, however.


I wake up in the morning, grab my caffeine of choice, and sit down at my desk. Sometimes I don’t turn my computer off at night so programs searching for work can continue to run. Sometimes I do shut it down only to have everything back up
and running just hours later. Screens pop up in front of me listing the day’s current work opportunities on AMT. My day starts out the same as it does for tens of thousands of other workers. Even though we rarely meet the other people who do the same work we do, we know they are out there.


The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition, defines ‘job’ as listed below:


Noun, A regular activity performed in exchange for payment, especially as one’s trade, occupation, or profession.


Noun, A position of employment.


Noun, A task that must be done.


Noun, A specified duty or responsibility: synonym: task.


Check, check, check, and check.


I applied to work on AMT and went through their verification process. I anxiously awaited the email that would tell me if they had accepted me. Luckily they did and I went through the probationary period. I trained myself by seeking out other workers on Facebook, watching YouTube videos, and visiting forums. I work every day on tasks and have for the last five years. I constantly test for qualifications for new work. I am a turker by profession and am referred to as
such by AMT and the requesters who use the platform.


Turking is a job.


Some American turkers receive 1099 forms from AMT for tax purposes. We include our Amazon income, 1099 or not, on our yearly taxes.


Turking is a job.


Even though what we do fits the very definition of a job, there are still people out there that think otherwise. Even with the federal and state governments legitimizing Gig Economy workers by providing them unemployment benefits for the first time ever, there are still people out there who don’t think we deserve them if our work is affected.


Turking IS a job. I am asking you to own it with me. I am asking you to stand up with me for proper treatment. I am asking you to be proud of the work you do and I am asking you to help change the narrative.


by Krystal Kauffman

Participation in an Art Film

Hello, I am a visual artist that makes short films.

I am looking for Mturk worker participants for a short art film about the labor conditions of online work. Participants will re-perform moments from a failed utopian labor camp set up by Henry Ford in the 1920s in the Brazilian Amazon. We will re-perform scenes from this real history as if it was happening now. Participants will need to have the ability to shoot footage at their location on their own devices. At a later date, participants will be paid to travel to a specific location for a studio shoot with me and a professional film crew.


This position will be paid, and participants will need to agree to an ongoing involvement in the project from now until the end of the year.


During the Coronovirus pandemic, all work will happen online.


We will meet and shoot in person only when it is entirely safe to do so.


Please contact me if you are interested in participating:


danielledeanstudio@gmail.com


Article submitted

Submitting articles to the Turkopticon newsletter

This newsletter is a space for us at the Turkopticon community to hear from each other. Submit short pieces up to 250 words to newsletter@turkopticon.net with Newsletter submission in the subject line.

Submissions should follow the civility guidelines. Want more than 250 words?

Get in touch and let us know your article idea.


.

Newsletter 1


Welcome to our 1st newsletter from your
NEW Turkopticon team.

For ten years, Turkopticon has run as a very small shop of a few moderators and Lilly and Six. This was not a sustainable model. We are reorganizing Turkopticon to build better software, build a stronger community, and make Turking good work through and beyond the tool.
Here are some of the current working groups we have

  • Mods project – redesigning how we recruit, onboard, and work together as moderators.
  • Worker liaison – staying in touch with Turkers across communities and geographic regions to gather feedback, identify issues and help address problems by communicating with Amazon as needed.
  • Newsletter – producing a regular newsletter to keep Turkopticon community members up to date with what is happening, ways to get involved, and other content of interest to workers.
  • Media – posting to our Turkopticon twitter and social media outlets.
  • Software – improving our software front-end & back-end code, and processes.
  • Coordinator committee – making sure we have our weekly meetings, agendas, and projects are getting done.

We also have other projects to strengthen our organization with trainings and stabilized financial footing. Working groups meet as necessary online to get things done. Curious? Might want to get more involved? Do you want Turkopticon to thrive? Join us for a meeting. We meet each week on Saturdays, 11am Eastern, through Zoom audio/chat conference. There, we check on what we’ve accomplished and decided what we need to do next. Please email info@turkopticon.info with your Turkopticon id and why TO matters to you. We will send in return instructions on how to join the meeting.




Turkopticon is looking to expand its Moderating team by a few fellow turkers. Moderators would be required to spend approximately four hours a month moderating flagged reviews.


Prerequisites involve a general understanding of
Amazon Mechanical Turk and a history of using Turkopticon to review requesters.


If interested please fill out the following form.
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfWJ394HNm4ZiyDLN-2s9Vv66PX6Ul98FAMIqYORMCqOAjD5A/

Turking is a Job

Turking is a Job

I recently spoke with a friend I had not talked to for several months. As with most “catch-up” conversations, the topic of jobs came up quickly. She asked me how things were going for me with work. I told her that since the height of COVID-19 in the United States some of the work had dwindled as companies and universities were shutting down. I explained how frustrating it was. I told her how I was taking whatever work I could, even if the pay was low. She meant well but she said the thing that I cannot stand hearing:“It is too bad that you can’t work a real job.”

I know I am not the only turker who has heard this or something similar. Of course I wanted to say so many different things in response but I didn’t. This did make me think long and hard about how I feel about what I do, however.

I wake up in the morning, grab my caffeine of choice, and sit down at my desk. Sometimes I don’t turn my computer off at night so programs searching for work can continue to run. Sometimes I do shut it down only to have everything back up and running just hours later. Screens pop up in front of me listing the day’s current work opportunities on AMT. My day starts out the same as it does for tens of thousands of other workers. Even though we rarely meet the other people who do the same work we do, we know they are out there.

The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition, defines ‘job’ as listed below:

Noun, A regular activity performed in exchange for payment, especially as one’s trade, occupation, or profession.

Noun, A position of employment.

Noun, A task that must be done.

>Noun, A specified duty or responsibility: synonymtask.

Check, check, check, and check.

I applied to work on AMT and went through their verification process. I anxiously awaited the email that would tell me if they had accepted me. Luckily they did and I went through the probationary period. I trained myself by seeking out other workers on Facebook, watching YouTube videos, and visiting forums. I work every day on tasks and have for the last five years. I constantly test for qualifications for new work. I am a turker by profession and am referred to as such by AMT and the requesters who use the platform.

Turking is a job.

Some American turkers receive 1099 forms from AMT for tax purposes. We include our Amazon income, 1099 or not, on our yearly taxes.

Turking is a job.

Even though what we do fits the very definition of a job, there are still people out there that think otherwise. Even with the federal and state governments legitimizing Gig Economy workers by providing them unemployment benefits for the first time ever, there are still people out there who don’t think we deserve them if our work is affected.

Turking IS a job. I am asking you to own it with me. I am asking you to stand up with me for proper treatment. I am asking you to be proud of the work you do and I am asking you to help change the narrative.

by Krystal Kauffman